Singing Class: Ages 4-7

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This course is for children aged between 4 and 7.
Introduce your children to the fundamentals of music with Helen using children’s folk songs and singing games. Nurture their emerging musicianship!

Helen uses the Kodály Approach, a singing approach that engages the children with singing games and movement. Every child has a singing voice, for free, in their homes so this approach is ideal for both the classroom and for home learning.

Each lesson builds on songs and skills from the previous lesson so each lesson should be taken in order.

Lessons cover


About the Kodály Approach

The Kodály Approach takes children from fledgling musicians, developing their skills gradually by breaking down each musical element into the smallest steps. The approach continues beyond high school (where the ABRSM accepts certain Kodály certificates as alternatives to Grade 5 theory), to conservatoire level and beyond.

Kodály himself said that the first task for the teacher is to “teach music and singing in school in such a way that is not a torture but a joy for the pupil.” The children think they are having the most wonderful time playing singing games with their friends but in fact will also be learning in the most effective way. Singing based music lessons develop:

  • Performance skills: singing tunefully, expressively and healthily with movement
  • Critical-thinking skills: learning musical concepts and developing musical literacy
  • Creative skills: improvising and composing
  • Listening skills: actively listening to music such as folk songs and Classical repertoire
  • Social and health skills: Confidence, self-esteem, respect for others, turn taking, breathing, posture, calmness and focus in other school work too
  • Academic benefits: speech and language, reading, phonological awareness, vocabulary, spatial awareness, positional language and numeracy. “Musical activity involved nearly every region of the brain we know about, and nearly every neural subsystem.” Daniel Levitin

“The fact that children can make beautiful music is less significant than the fact that music can make beautiful children.” Cheryl Lavender